TMC Staffing Blog

Information For The AV & Broadcast Hiring Managers & Candidates

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Blog Post

Posted by Scott Mink on January 16, 2018

Are You Making The Right Candidate Choice?

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In today’s world, it really is hard to tell if a candidate is a good fit for your open position or your company culture.  You can interview someone all day long, look at their perfectly laid out resume and still ask yourself “Are they right for us?”  I myself have been fooled several times over the years by people who can present themselves very well in the interview setting with all the right answers and a great looking resume then finding out they are a very bad fit for the company.  

Luckily, easy screenings using social media sometimes reveal a candidate’s true colors. Social media screens are suggested standard practice for any hire. Make sure to check with legal counsel to understand what employers may or may not consider and say about social media profiles, before and after an employee is hired.

Are They Respectful

Twitter should be the first place you look.  Most users keep their profile public so you can easily see a person’s tweets and retweets and who they follow.

-Everyone I work with is an idiot.
-My boss is a pain in the rear.
-I hate working here.

These are all tweets I have seen people post.  They speak for themselves and for me would probably raise a red flag.  

Precision

Does all your candidate’s information match from all sources.  A big one is Linked In.  Work history and education discrepancies between Linked In and their resume can raise the red flag.  Now could this just be something overlooked by your candidate?  Sure, but if there is suspicion in the first place this is a good way to help weed out any potential untruths.

Issues With Anger

Many times Facebook and Twitter users use these accounts to voice opinions.  What you are looking for is anger filled rants, threats, vulgarity or racist comments or postings.  Someone active on these social platforms will most times reveal these types of personalities and can be useful in making a hiring decision.

Other personal qualities to watch for include narcissism, nudity, hate speech, violence, excessive profanity, and bad grammar.  Have they talked about being sued or getting someone fired?   

Remember all of the items above are reminders to us all to be aware of what we post on our social accounts.  They can be used in a hiring process and decide the Yes or No decision.

Posted by The2016Admin on January 3, 2018

Interviewer Best Practices

I found this guide at rework.withgoogle.com and thought it would be good to share with everyone.  There really are some good tips and it is good to review occasionally to make sure your interviews are being conducted in the best possible way.

In today’s hiring climate, it’s more important than ever to be successful at:

  1. Attracting talent
  2. Cultivating a long-term pipeline of candidates

We found that the interview (and interviewers in particular) is the biggest driver of a candidate’s overall satisfaction with the hiring process, and their interview experience can make or break a decision to accept an offer.

One of the hardest things to do during the interview process is to strike the right balance between assessing the candidate’s skills with challenging questions and encouraging the candidate that the company is the right place for them to start or continue a career. For the company, you want to demonstrate the scope of the work and the mission of your company. For candidates, they want to feel like your company is seeking their talent, and that they can make an impact and a home once they join. It’s important to remember that candidates are evaluating you as much as you are them.

When interviewing a candidate, there’s a lot to remember, but we generally break it down into two categories:

  • Questions
  • Behavior

Tips for asking questions

Questions should probe based on the attribute you’re trying to assess. In general, we try to do the following:

  • Open with a behavioral question or “tell me about a time when…” question about the candidate’s experience. This gets them to talk about something they know and will calm them down before diving into anything related to hypothetical, or more specifically, general knowledge or coding questions.
  • Make it clear what we’re looking for when asking the question. A common complaint from candidates is that they weren’t sure what the interviewer wanted from an answer or how much time they should spend trying to figure it out.
  • Be flexible. Understand when a candidate is failing and either give a hint to get their thoughts moving or guide the conversation to a different question. If the candidate is taking too long on a single question, gently switch topics. Here’s a good example of this: “To be mindful of time, why don’t we move on to a different topic? We can revisit this if you would like at the end.”
  • Overall, be in charge of the time. Leave time for candidate questions and try not to go over, as it will create a lag time for all subsequent interviewers.
  • Avoid questions that prompt candidates to reveal information about a protected status:
“Which country are you from?”
“Are you available to work on religious holidays?”
“Do you have a work permit?”
“How did you learn that foreign language?”
Candidate: “What are the best schools in this area?”
Interviewer: “How old are your kids?”

Tips for interviewer behavior

An interviewer’s attitude is essential to providing a great experience. Interviewers might do hundreds of interviews, but for the candidate, this might be their first (and only) interview experience at your company.

During an interview, we think the best way to make the candidate feel comfortable is to be comfortable around them. Here’s an interview and candidate experience breakdown, based on a 30, 45, or 60 minute interview.

 

Interview step  

Timing

 

Actions to take
Introduction 2/5/7 min ●     Show up on time

●     Ask if candidate needs a drink, snack, or restroom break

●     Sit 90° from candidate and try to grab a view of the door

●     Introduce yourself and your team

●     Preface interview with a mention about your note-taking behavior

Questions 20/32/40 min ●     Open with a behavioral/experience-based question

●     Ask questions!

●     Keep the interview conversational

●     Frame your questions so candidates know what you’re looking for

●     Be flexible about probing further, moving on, or switching topics

●     Be aware of your time

●     Engage with the candidate (make eye contact, nod, etc.)

Candidate questions 5/5/8 min ●     Be humble (throughout the interview as well)

●     Give honest answers, and give the candidate a sense of the role/team

Thank and sell 3/3/5 min ●     Highlight the reasons you like working at your company

●     Try to tie how their skills and interests would fit in well at your company (they need to be able to imagine working here)

●     Thank the candidate for their time

How to avoid the most common traps

Here is some advice based on the most common themes we see from candidate feedback.

  • Show up on time. Being late throws off the candidate’s confidence, might take away from other interviewers’ time, and shows a general lack of respect.
  • Don’t start right into the questions! Candidates and interviewers both often mention this as a negative experience.
  • Make eye contact. A common complaint from candidates is that the interviewer was buried in note-taking. Take thorough notes, but conversational interviews require a high level of interaction.
  • Be humble. Another common piece of feedback is that interviewers seem like gatekeepers, judging a candidate in a high-pressure situation. No matter the candidate’s performance, they should feel like they answered a challenging but role-related question, and that you are working with them to assess their skill, not showing off your own.
  • Reassure the candidate. Don’t let a candidate believe they are failing. Not all candidates will be successful in their interview, but it does not help them to feel like they don’t have any chance at success.
    • Nod or engage with the candidate as they talk through their answer. Not only does this encourage them, but it shows that you are actively listening to their ideas.
    • Avoid saying things like “I was actually looking for this answer…” or “you should have thought about the problem this way” — it doesn’t help the candidate to know that they failed, and you likely have to move on anyway.
Posted by Scott Mink on November 15, 2017

Recruiting Services – SWOT Analysis

The Mink Company – SWOT Analysis

For many years, businesses have asked the question should I use a staffing agency to assist with full time and contract placements.  In an effort to help companies make an educated decision on this TMC has done a SWOT analysis.  What is a SWOT analysis?  It identifies strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats to any business related question you might have.  It might not fit your business environment 100% but it will give you some additional information to make an informed decision whether or not to use TMC as your staffing agency.

Internal

Strengths

Weaknesses

1.       You will have access to a vast network of industry specific candidates.  TMC has thousands of job seekers already in our database for the AV, IT and broadcasting industries.

2.       You will save money.  The US Bureau of Labor & Statistics states the average cost of adding a new employee is $58,000.  This includes screening candidates, manager and employee back fill overtime.

3.       You will have a guaranteed hire.  TMC provides a 90-day guarantee on any new hire.

4.       You get to try before you buy.  Contract to hire is a TMC staffing option.  If the candidate is not a good fit, you can move on without risk.

5.       Your managers will have more time to focus on the day to day business instead of searching and pre-screening potential candidates.

 

1.       You will still need to review resumes and pre-screen candidates. You will still need to do some screening, but TMC will only send you candidates that we feel are qualified for the position.  Your time doing this will be very minimal.

2.       Your business will not need an internal recruiting team.  For some this may be difficult to adjust too.

 

External

Opportunities

Threats

1.       Have the ability to expand and constrict your labor force easily by using contract employees.

2.       Management will have more time to focus on business resulting in satisfied customers and a faster growth.

3.       Your business will have access to candidates that an internal recruiter would not have access too.

4.       Improvement of productivity from current employees.  TMC can help fill vacant positions quickly which will help reduce employee burnout by filling in for insufficient staff.

1.       You will rely on external sources to provide your new candidate funnel.  TMC will ensure that you have the candidates you need to fill your open positions.

 

SWOT Analysis Summary

 

Employers have difficulty finding qualified candidates to fill job openings. Many are quick to say there is a talent pool that lacks job skills, business knowledge, experience and formal qualifications. At the same time staffing agencies are sometimes avoided because companies believe cost to be a barrier. Frankly, this is the furthest from the truth. Employers should weigh the cost of lost opportunity by having a position unfilled, the cost of having a poor hire, and the endless and tiresome cost of searching for a candidate.  The advantages greatly out-weigh the weaknesses and threats.

 

Posted by Scott Mink on October 22, 2017

Linked In – Do’s & Don’ts

As I’m searching for potential candidates in LinkedIn I have noticed several things that people do or don’t do in their profiles that as a recruiter become very frustrating.  Now here is my disclaimer.  If you have no intentions of ever getting a new job then please ignore this posting.  To digress,  I was once asked by a manager of mine “Would you ever consider relocating?”  My immediate answer was no, never.  He said don’t answer that too fast.  I’m offering you double the salary and the location is the Bahamas.  Point being even if you think you will never look for or consider a new position, never say never.  🙂

Tip Number 1:
Always have a profile photo uploaded and displayed.  When I’m searching for candidates I skip over any profile that does not include a photo.  There are several reasons why I do this.
1.  Most of the time I will find that a profile without a photo has been inactive for a very long time. The profile has been abandoned and I will not waste an In-Mail message on this person.
2.  A lot of recruiting these days happens remotely and it is great to be able to put a face to a name.
3.  I don’t care what you look like.  I do care that you are confident enough to put a picture of yourself in your profile.

Tip Number 2:
I have attempted to send people InMail messages and get a response that this person has turned off the ability to receive InMail.  Remember that when someone sends you an InMail message they actually pay to be able to do that.  A recruiter is reaching out to see if you might have interest in an open position he or she is recruiting for.  You have two options, ignore the message or respond and say you’re not interested.  (We get an InMail credit if you respond so it is always appreciated when you do.)

Tip Number 3:
If you get a connection request from a recruiter don’t just blindly accept the connection.  Review the person’s profile who is asking to connect and confirm they have other connections in your industry and are legit.  Side note on this:  I will send a request to someone who I think is qualified for a position I have open.  I will say in my request “Hey I have a position open that I think you may be a good fit for” and if you accept I will send the details and add you to my candidate database.

Tip Number 4:
Make sure you go through all your LinkedIn notifications and confirm you are notified via email at least once a day for any Connection Requests, InMail messages or Direct Messages.  I can’t tell you how many times I get a response 6 months later from someone and they ask if the position is still open.  I don’t check my LI messages very often.  9 times out of 10 the position has been filled.

Tip Number 5:
Sales Profiles – This goes for your resume as well as your Linked In profile.  Make sure in your profile to give a sentence or two on industry you sell for and the types of products you sold.  It’s amazing how many people don’t do this.

 

 

Posted by Scott Mink on September 26, 2017

Scotts Favorite Resume Template

I see a lot of resumes come across my desk every day. When I find one I like I ask the person if I can use it as one of my favorite resume templates.   Feel free to download the one you like and plug in your information.